Self-powered IoT devices

Self-powered IoT devices

Powering the Internet of Things was a central theme at the Tyndall Technology Day which took place in Dublin on 11th October 2016. COMPOSITION was introduced as a key application area for energy harvesting.

Dr. Kieran Drain, CEO of Tyndall National Institute & Mike Hayes, Senior Programme Manager, Tyndall National Institute at Tyndall Technology Day with an IoT sensor (an indoor solar powered temperature, light and humidity wireless sensor)

Dr. Kieran Drain, CEO of Tyndall National Institute (left) & Mike Hayes, Senior Programme Manager, Tyndall National Institute at Tyndall Technology Day with an IoT sensor (an indoor, solar powered,  wireless sensor for measuring temperature, light and humidity).

The event showcased IoT devices and solutions for the future, including wireless sensors which can be self-powered through energy harvesting technologies such as solar power. Such technologies will be demonstrated in COMPOSITION where the sensors will collect data to improve manufacturing processes.

Energy harvesting is a key technology enabler to self-power IoT devices, in this case wireless sensors, for Smart Factory applications. COMPOSITION is an example of a key application area for energy harvesting where Tyndall is collaborating with Boston Scientific in Ireland and Kleemann Lifts in Greece to determine how wireless sensor data can be gathered to improve intra and inter-factory efficiencies such as lead time, agility, resource usage, alleviating bottlenecks and planning scenarios, explains Mike Hayes, Senior Programme Manager at Tyndall National Institute.

Read more about the Tyndall Technology Day and COMPOSITION.

In COMPOSITION, Tyndall National Institute is in charge of WP7 which deals with the integration of technology components into the COMPOSITION platform.

2017-06-30T09:28:51+00:00